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  • Resource: Vega - Community Cinema | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Call for papers Teachers Resources Resource: Animation and Education Resource: Cinema en Curs Resource: Donnelly, See You Tomorrow Resource: Mirjana Borčić discussing film Resource: Alves, 16-week film course Resource: Felipe Correa Documentary Resource: Michael Daly Resource: Jamie - UC Resource: Vega - Community Cinema Search Results Taking Wonders to the Margins: delivering community cinema workshops within marginalised communities in Chile Young filmmakers dressed as the Lumiere Brothers welcome the audience to a screening of their film Taking wonders to the margins (Maravillas al Margen ) ​ Alicia Vega is a Chilean film scholar, educator and outreach worker. In 1985 she initiated a series of cinema workshops within highly disadvantaged communities across Chile, which sought to provide younger children with early, formative understandings of cinema. Over the next 30 years Alicia and her team of instructors delivered hundreds of workshops across the country. Illustrated with photos, examples of the children's work, and testimonials from participants, her article is a rich and intimate account of how film can be used within community learning and outreach programmes. “The main achievements of the workshops certainly include that children experienced an increase in their self-esteem, developed their creativity and learned some fundamental values, such as working in a team. But our main objective, which was fundamental to us, was that the children had a good time.” - Alicia Vega Download the full article for free from the Film Education Journal Key points to explore Vega’s workshops consisted of weekly sessions where children watched films and then undertook various arts and crafts activities which were designed to break down the mechanics of filmmaking for them. This later developed into practical filmmaking sessions where they wrote, acted and filmed their own short films. ​ Vega introduces readers to the workshop methodology, particularly its focus on the history of early cinema and screen pioneers such as the Lumiere Brothers and Charlie Chaplin. Other topics covered in the article include: A detailed description of the arts and crafts activities which were designed to explore the history and mechanics of creating moving images, including the recreation of nineteenth century optical illusion toys such as zoetropes, the ‘magic roll’ and kinetoscopes (pp. 196-197) Vega's pedagogical approach - her belief of treating everyone equally, allowing the children a large amount of autonomy, and her solution to behavioral issues (pp.201-205) A discussion of the funding difficulties the workshops faced, including a frank overview of the economic hardships experienced by the local communities (pp. 205-215) A description of the films that were shown to workshop participants and their reactions to them (pp.216-221) Ideas for the classroom: Creating thaumatropes is a simple yet effective way of introducing learners to the concept of 'the moving image’ in its most basic form. The Norris Museum provides free downloadable resources and video instructions of how to create your own thaumatropes and kaleidoscopes:

  • Teachers Resources | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources Resource: Donnelly, See You Tomorrow Resource: Mirjana Borčić discussing film Resource: Alves, 16-week film course Resource: Felipe Correa Documentary Resource: Michael Daly Resource: Jamie - UC Resource: Vega - Community Cinema Search Results Filmmaking about social issues with primary school children in Scotland Read about the experiences of Scottish teachers at in Edinburgh. This case study of the making of the short film is a great first-hand account of some of the benefits and challenges to consider . Discover a range of tips and ideas for you to take away and use back in the classroom with your pupils. Granton Primary School See You Tomorrow when creating films in a primary-school context MORE ​ Keywords : #filmmaking; #racism; #primary school ; #emotional literacy Discussing films in the classroom with children of different ages in Slovenia How can we best approach discussing films in the classroom? is one of the foremost figures within Slovenian film education. Explore a range of her ideas on how film can be used as a means of facilitating discussion in the classroom, and in particular on how to ensure that discussions are pupil-centred and encourage creative thinking. Mirjana Borcic MORE ​ Keywords : #discussing film #Slovenia #student voice; #active viewing A 16 week course of practical filmmaking with secondary school children in Portugal Explore the detailed overview of a filmmaking project from start to finish, which provides a useful model for . This case study of film education in Portugal takes readers through the 16 weeks of a filmmaking course, acting almost as a project diary, describing the weekly tasks and outcomes. secondary school teachers interested in making films with their students MORE ​ Keywords : #filmmaking; #Portugal #secondary school; #collaborative;

  • TEST-ALVES-MOBILE | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources A 16 Week Course of Practical Filmmaking with Secondary School Children in Portugal ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Realidades Ocultas . Dir. Mariana Sousa. 2019. S hort film production in educational contexts: a methodological proposal from the project “Olhar Pela Lente” [LINK TO ARTICLE] ​ This article describes a filmmaking project called ‘Olhar pela lente’ (Look Through the Lens) which took place in a state secondary school in northern Portugal in 2018. Over 16 weeks, working with 160 students, project tutors Pedro Alves and Ana Sofia Pereira worked alongside teachers on a structured programme which combined aspects of film theory, film analysis and film practice. The school had successfully applied for funding which enabled them to buy filmmaking equipment and by the end of the project students created 27 short films on a range of different topics. ‘Olhar plea lente' demonstrates that the school is an important meeting place between young people and film. By providing the necessary guidance and resources to create opportunities for practical filmmaking, the school is a catalyst for personal and collective student growth, fostering skills and knowledge that positions students as better informed, integrated and active citizens….it is important to motivate young people to be interested in cinema, to discover what it is, what it means to make films and what we can think, feel, express and live through them.’ - Alves and Pereira ​ Key points to explore ​ The article provides a clear overview of a filmmaking project from start to finish, providing a useful model for teachers who would like to make films with their students. At the same time the authors do not shy away from describing the challenges involved and provide several key tips for readers to keep in mind. ​ The authors describe: ​ The unique benefits of schools as spaces for young people to encounter film and how ‘filmmaking and film literacy foster students’ motivation, engagement and productivity in terms of their relationship with their school and wider sociocultural environment.’ (pp.2-4) A clear timeline which can be used when planning your own filmmaking project. The article takes readers through the 16 weeks of the filmmaking course, and at points acts almost as a project diary, describing the weekly tasks and outcomes (pp.8-21) An emphasis on the importance of preparation, and also of valuing the filmmaking process as a learning experience just as much as the final result (p.7) Reflections on how the project could have been improved, particularly in terms of managing staff and students’ expectations, overall time management, and the challenges of working with less motivated students (pp.22-25) ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Ideas for the classroom ​ You don't need expensive cameras to make films with your students - they can be made simply on school iPads or smartphones! For a great guide to filmmaking with iPads, check out the free resource provided by Into Film: https://www.intofilm.org/resources/1146 ​ Further resources and opportunities ​ Four of the 26 films have been uploaded to the Portuguese film education platform Primeiro Plano, and can be accessed through the following link: . The short film is embedded at the bottom of the page. https://primeiroplano.ciac.pt/projeto/olhar-pela-lente/ Hidden Realities For teachers based in Scotland who are keen to develop their filmmaking skills, a number of local community film organisations provide filmmaking workshops and courses. Try Screen Education Edinburgh: GMAC Film (Glasgow) or SHMU - Station House Media Unit (Aberdeen) https://www.screen-ed.org / https://www.gmacfilm.com / http://www.shmu.org.uk/ Have you made a film with your class? Consider submitting it to the Scottish Youth Film Festival or FANS Youth Film Festival http://syff.scot/ https://filmaccess.scot/festival/ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Listen to Pedro Alves and Ana Sofia Pereira discuss the challenges and opportunities of their high-school filmmaking project with Flip Kulakiewicz, Administrator at the Film Education Journal.

  • Borcic - Backup | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources Discussing films in the classroom with children of different ages in Slovenia ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Unveiling the View with Mirjana Borčić (Maja Weiss, Slovenija/Slovenia, 2017) ​ Triangulating a discussion between film, the viewer and a wider frame of life: reflections on a life in film education ​ [LINK TO ARTICLE] ​ Mirjana Borčić is one of the foremost figures within Slovenian film education. This article - a translation of some her writings about her experiences teaching film - contains a range of ideas on how film can be used as a tool to facilitate discussion in the classroom. Mirjana Borčić's emphasis is on making discussion pupil-centred and to encourage creative thinking. Using films to facilitate discussion is a great way for young people to develop their reflective and analytical skills and learn to give and accept feedback from their peers in a thoughtful and sensitive way. For pupils who struggle to engage with more traditional written texts, films are a rich source of material to develop literacy skills, engage with a wide range of topics and themes, and develop their knowledge of different cultures. ‘One has to be aware that every viewer experiences a film in a unique way: a film projected in a cinema with one hundred people will have one hundred interpretations. If we want every individual to enrich their own experience of the film through contact with the experiences of their fellow viewers, a dialogue needs to be established. Discussing a film is not the same as explaining a film: it is a search for meaning that avoids generalisation and encourages creative thinking.’ Mirjana Borčić Points to explore ​ Borčić makes several keys points and suggestions which you can read about it more detail. She emphasises that while film can be used as a text, it is important to recognise that, as a visual medium, it should not be analysed in the same way as written literature. (p.2) In the section 'How to discuss a film' (pp.13-15) Borčić makes a number of suggestions which teachers can keep in mind when planning film discussions: ​ The importance of challenging pupils and asking them ‘slightly more than they are capable of’ to trigger their interest. The value of using short films in the classroom over feature films. Borčić breaks down the discussion process into distinct phases – the introduction, the course of the conversation, and the role of the leader as discussion facilitator. ​ Questioning with film within the classroom Borčić calls for the facilitation of open dialogue with young people around film, what she calls the ‘affective method’. This can be well integrated with young people at different attainment levels, using differing questioning strategies. For example, open dialogue where students raise their hands to answer questions might be complimented by other techniques for those less confident in verbalising their thoughts, such as or think, pair and share tasks. As Borčić states, this allows young people to ‘seek and discover the value of the film through shared impressions’. KWL grids ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Ideas for the classroom and further resources Set up a film club. This is a wonderful way to regularly discuss films with your pupils and introduce them to a wide range of cultures, topics and issues – and it’s a lot of fun too! provide a free film club service for schools which includes DVDs, film guides, and opportunities for club members to publish film reviews online. Into Film https://www.intofilm.org/clubs ​ is the online learning resource for the Moving Image Archive. The site includes over 25 hours of footage, a step-by-step guide to moving image education, and instructions for creating your own video essay using archive film. Scotland on Screen https://scotlandonscreen.org.uk/ ​ The collection includes 16 films (fiction, documentaries, feature-length and short films) selected for young audiences (ages 6 to 19). The films are representative of each country in the programme and reflect the diversity and distinctiveness of European cinema. Each film has an accompanying media kit for teachers to download. CinEd https://www.cined.eu/en Listen to Mark Reid (BFI, Film Education Journal) talking about Mirjana Borcic and how best to discuss film with learners with Nuria Aidelman (A Bao A Qu, Spain), Alejandro Bachmann (former head of film education, Austrian Film Museum) and Charlotte Giese (Danish Film Institute).

  • Backup - Granton | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources Filmmaking about social issues with primary school children in Scotland ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Aoife Donnelly and Avril Whelan (teachers, Granton Primary School) and Jamie Chambers (ECA, Film Education Journal) discussing how they used film in the classroom. See You Tomorrow: A case study of the Understanding Cinema project at Granton Primary School in Edinburgh ​ [LINK TO ARTICLE] ​ This article describes a filmmaking project which took place at an after-school film club at Granton Primary School in Edinburgh from 2016 to 2017. It is written by the teachers and filmmaker who were involved in the project and is a great first-hand account of the benefits and challenges to consider when creating films in a primary classroom context. There are a range of tips and ideas for you to take away and use back in the classroom with your pupils. The final film created by the pupils can be viewed online for free at the link below and provides a template which pupils can use when creating their own. The film could also be a starting point for conversations with your class around the challenging topic of bullying and racism within school life, discussing the difficult issues faced by the character and how they are resolved. “Seeing what seemed to me a bunch of sporadic, random clips all fit together as a film with a hugely powerful message was very moving. Furthermore, the kids who wrote, directed, acted and filmed each and every scene (lots of times!) were speechless watching their hard work back. Seeing it all put together and to see their project turned into a film was something they were very proud of. I remember them saying ‘that’s so good, I can’t believe we made that’” - Aoife Donnelly, Class Teacher (p.74) ​ : Key points to explore The article discusses a range of themes - below are a summary of certain points which you can read about in more detail, with so you can find them easily: page references • Setting up a filmmaking project: tips for preparing pupils; taking photographs as a way of expressing emotion visually and learning how to frame shots; how pupils learn to reflect upon and evaluate their work (pp.66-67) • The project’s direct links to the Curriculum for Excellence and how filmmaking can develop pupils’ skills in a range of key learning areas as well as their emotional literacy and personal development (p.67, 70) • How filmmaking is beneficial in developing pupils’ teamworking abilities and communication skills, particularly for students who struggle with traditional literacy and numeracy (p. 67, pp.69-70) • Challenges that teachers and pupils might face (p.67, 69, 72) ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ : Ideas for the classroom Watch See You Tomorrow at the link above. ​ 1. Discuss the following questions with your class: ​ • What is the message of the film? • When making a film, what do you think are the biggest challenges for the filmmakers? • If you had the chance to make this film, what would you do differently? 2. Now rewatch the first minute of the film. Ask your students the following questions: • How many shots are there in the first 60 seconds? Get pupils to clap every time there is a cut. • Discuss the following questions with your pupils. How many shot types can they identify (close-up, medium shot, long shot etc)? Why do the filmmakers use these certain shots? What do they tell us about the characters? : Further resources ​ : film education charity Into Film has a free (registration required) step-by-step filmmaking guide, designed for primary schools, which will take you through all the stages of filmmaking: On practical filmmaking https://www.intofilm.org/resources/23 Films which tackle the theme of bullying: Into Film has a detail list of resources and film guides for both primary and secondary pupils https://www.intofilm.org/theme/33 Watch See You Tomorrow, the film discussed in the article above. Watch Aoife Donnelly and Avril Whelan (teachers, Granton Primary School) and Jamie Chambers (ECA, Film Education Journal) discussing how they used film in the classroom both for See You Tomorrow and beyond, with contributions from some of the children who participated in the process.

  • Backup Alves | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources A 16 Week Course of Practical Filmmaking with Secondary School Children in Portugal ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Realidades Ocultas . Dir. Mariana Sousa. 2019. S hort film production in educational contexts: a methodological proposal from the project “Olhar Pela Lente” [LINK TO ARTICLE] ​ This article describes a filmmaking project called ‘Olhar pela lente’ (Look Through the Lens) which took place in a state secondary school in northern Portugal in 2018. Over 16 weeks, working with 160 students, project tutors Pedro Alves and Ana Sofia Pereira worked alongside teachers on a structured programme which combined aspects of film theory, film analysis and film practice. The school had successfully applied for funding which enabled them to buy filmmaking equipment and by the end of the project students created 27 short films on a range of different topics. ‘Olhar plea lente' demonstrates that the school is an important meeting place between young people and film. By providing the necessary guidance and resources to create opportunities for practical filmmaking, the school is a catalyst for personal and collective student growth, fostering skills and knowledge that positions students as better informed, integrated and active citizens….it is important to motivate young people to be interested in cinema, to discover what it is, what it means to make films and what we can think, feel, express and live through them.’ - Alves and Pereira ​ Key points to explore ​ The article provides a clear overview of a filmmaking project from start to finish, providing a useful model for teachers who would like to make films with their students. At the same time the authors do not shy away from describing the challenges involved and provide several key tips for readers to keep in mind. ​ The authors describe: ​ The unique benefits of schools as spaces for young people to encounter film and how ‘filmmaking and film literacy foster students’ motivation, engagement and productivity in terms of their relationship with their school and wider sociocultural environment.’ (pp.2-4) A clear timeline which can be used when planning your own filmmaking project. The article takes readers through the 16 weeks of the filmmaking course, and at points acts almost as a project diary, describing the weekly tasks and outcomes (pp.8-21) An emphasis on the importance of preparation, and also of valuing the filmmaking process as a learning experience just as much as the final result (p.7) Reflections on how the project could have been improved, particularly in terms of managing staff and students’ expectations, overall time management, and the challenges of working with less motivated students (pp.22-25) ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Ideas for the classroom ​ You don't need expensive cameras to make films with your students - they can be made simply on school iPads or smartphones! For a great guide to filmmaking with iPads, check out the free resource provided by Into Film: https://www.intofilm.org/resources/1146 ​ Further resources and opportunities ​ Four of the 26 films have been uploaded to the Portuguese film education platform Primeiro Plano, and can be accessed through the following link: . The short film is embedded at the bottom of the page. https://primeiroplano.ciac.pt/projeto/olhar-pela-lente/ Hidden Realities For teachers based in Scotland who are keen to develop their filmmaking skills, a number of local community film organisations provide filmmaking workshops and courses. Try Screen Education Edinburgh: GMAC Film (Glasgow) or SHMU - Station House Media Unit (Aberdeen) https://www.screen-ed.org / https://www.gmacfilm.com / http://www.shmu.org.uk/ Have you made a film with your class? Consider submitting it to the Scottish Youth Film Festival or FANS Youth Film Festival http://syff.scot/ https://filmaccess.scot/festival/ Listen to Pedro Alves and Ana Sofia Pereira discuss the challenges and opportunities of their high-school filmmaking project with Flip Kulakiewicz, Administrator at the Film Education Journal.