top of page

Search Results

18 items found for ""

  • Resource: Felipe Correa Documentary | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources Resource: Teaching Film in Scotland Resource: The BFI and London Film School Resource: Animation and Education Resource: Cinema en Curs Resource: Donnelly, See You Tomorrow Resource: Mirjana Borčić discussing film Resource: Alves, 16-week film course Resource: Felipe Correa Documentary Resource: Michael Daly Resource: Jamie - UC Resource: Vega - Community Cinema Search Results Exploring local heritage through a documentary filmmaking project in Chile La Pequeña Historia de un Lobo de Meta (The Little Story of the Metal Wolf) Immaterial heritage and a sense of place in film-based art education: A case study of a documentary film project with secondary school children as part of Cine en curso Chile ​ Felipe Correa’s article describes the process of a documentary filmmaking project at a secondary school in Chile. Run as part of the film education programme Cine en curso , its aim was to encourage students to engage with the places, crafts and community where they live. Over the course of a year, students watched and analysed documentary films from different periods and cultures, whilst performing practical filmmaking inside and outside the school. At the end of the project, their short films (which documented and celebrated traditional local trades) were screened at a local cinema. ​ Watching and making documentary films is a fantastic way for educators to explore different social themes and issues with their pupils, and, as Correa says, ‘can compliment and articulate’ the learning aims and outcomes in many subject areas such as history, science, geography etc. For students who might feel intimidated at the idea of scriptwriting, documentary can be an accessible way of exploring storytelling through film and is an interesting way for them to critically examine and reflect on their own environments and everyday experiences. Download the full article for free from the Film Education Journal Key points to explore Correa’s article offers teachers lots of ideas about how watching and making documentaries can enhance students’ learning. Points of interest include: ​ The particular setting of this project within a school which ‘focuses on reintegration programmes for children and young people with learning disabilities’ as well as the pedagogical methodology behind Cine en curso (p.122-123) A detailed description of how photography is used as a practical exercise to teach students about colour, light, perspective, framing and composition. (p.124-125) How to prepare for the practical side of filmmaking in terms of choosing topics, discussing students’ roles, and interviewing documentary subjects (p.125-134) A reflection on how the project increased students’ overall levels of motivation and engagement. The filmmaking process also developed their skills of observation, participation and critical analysis, as well as empathy with their documentary subjects. (p.134-135) Watch La Pequeña Historia de un Lobo de Meta (The Little Story of the Metal Wolf) , the film discussed in the article above. Ideas for the classroom: You can watch the final documentary, La Pequeña Historia de un Lobo de Meta (The Little Story of the Metal Wolf) made by the students above. ​ Discuss the following questions with your class:​ What is the message of the film? When making a documentary, what do you think are the biggest challenges for the filmmakers? If you had the chance to make this film, what would you do differently? Now encourage discussion of what subjects would make for good documentaries. Ask your students the following questions:​ What topics from their own lives and communities would make for an interesting documentary? What questions would they want to ask the people they would film? What obstacles might there be to making that documentary, and how might they overcome them? ​

  • Resource: Jamie - UC | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources Resource: Teaching Film in Scotland Resource: The BFI and London Film School Resource: Animation and Education Resource: Cinema en Curs Resource: Donnelly, See You Tomorrow Resource: Mirjana Borčić discussing film Resource: Alves, 16-week film course Resource: Felipe Correa Documentary Resource: Michael Daly Resource: Jamie - UC Resource: Vega - Community Cinema Search Results Learning from the Understanding Cinema project in Scotland Poetic framing in Blue Raspberry Consolidating an experimental pedagogy: Exploring ecologies of film education within France’s Cinéma Cent Ans De Jeunesse and Scotland’s Understanding Cinema project(s) between 2013 and 2019 ​ ​ This article provides readers with a detailed, first-hand overview of the filmmaking project Understanding Cinema. Author and filmmaker Jamie Chambers worked as a tutor on the project between 2013 and 2019 in different schools across Edinburgh and the Lothians. Understanding Cinema is a moving image education project based on the long running international film education scheme, Le Cinéma, cent ans de jeunesse - created by Cinémathèque Française in Paris. Groups of young people between the ages of 6 and 18 across the world to take part in a structured programme of activity, combining practical and theoretical approaches to cinema that are focused around a different topic chosen every year. ​ In this article, Chambers reflects on both the highlights and challenges of the project. For teachers interested in making films, it provides a detailed account of how ‘a well-designed pedagogy’ can ‘allow simple, yet deep access to cinematic aesthetics’, as well as honest reflections on aspects of the project that were challenging to overcome. Download the full article for free from the Film Education Journal Key points to explore The rationale behind the project and challenges of connecting it with the Scottish curriculum and available school resources. (pp. 100-103) Case studies of the topics The Long Take (pp. 104-108), Climate/Weather (pp. 108-114) and Play (pp. 114-116), and their varying levels of success in terms of student engagement and understanding. Feedback from teachers involved in the projects, sharing how they worked alongside the film tutors and how their students benefited from the project. (pp. 107, 109-110, 111, 113) A discussion of the CCAJ methodology and how it can sometimes be challenging to implement on a practical level. (pp. 116-119) Blue Raspberry (Law Primary School, East Lothian) Ideas for the classroom: All of the films referenced in the article are available to watch online (links can be found in the article bibliography), providing a great source of materials for teachers who would like to see examples of films made by young people in schools. Have a look at our recommended films below: ​ Yes Sir (Wester Hailes Education Centre, Edinburgh) ​ Age range: suitable for ages 12+ Themes/subject areas: climate and weather, school setting, secondary school, teenagers, friendship, rebellion, shelter Synopsis: Over the course of one day, we follow a teenage boy and his encounters with teachers and friends. The film was created as a response to the following exercise: Students film a short film based ‘around a love story or a friendship which contains: a shelter. The elements of the weather that you experience when filming should be perceptible to the viewer Watch here Blue Raspberry (Law Primary School, East Lothian) ​​ Age range: suitable for ages 8+ Themes/subject areas: the long take, observational footage, voiceover, poetry, family life Synopsis: A young girl spends her pocket money on sweets, against the wishes of her parents. This film is made up of a choice of shots from 300 minutes of minute-long observational footage. It was created as a response to the following exercise: 'A Troubling Encounter ': at a certain moment a character or characters have an encounter which troubles them. Watch here In My World (Granton Primary School, Edinburgh) ​​ Age range: suitable for ages 8+ Themes/subject areas : play, primary school, friendship, bullying, imagination Synopsis: A young girl who is being bullied about her spelling mistakes runs out of class and hides from her classmates. The film was created as a response to the following exercise: Make a film where the story is interrupted at a certain moment, when a character finds their freedom through playing which allows them to escape from the confines of their everyday reality. Watch here

  • TEST-ALVES-MOBILE | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources Resource: Teaching Film in Scotland Resource: The BFI and London Film School Resource: Animation and Education Resource: Cinema en Curs Resource: Donnelly, See You Tomorrow Resource: Mirjana Borčić discussing film Resource: Alves, 16-week film course Resource: Felipe Correa Documentary Resource: Michael Daly Resource: Jamie - UC Resource: Vega - Community Cinema Search Results A 16 Week Course of Practical Filmmaking with Secondary School Children in Portugal ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Realidades Ocultas . Dir. Mariana Sousa. 2019. S hort film production in educational contexts: a methodological proposal from the project “Olhar Pela Lente” [LINK TO ARTICLE] ​ This article describes a filmmaking project called ‘Olhar pela lente’ (Look Through the Lens) which took place in a state secondary school in northern Portugal in 2018. Over 16 weeks, working with 160 students, project tutors Pedro Alves and Ana Sofia Pereira worked alongside teachers on a structured programme which combined aspects of film theory, film analysis and film practice. The school had successfully applied for funding which enabled them to buy filmmaking equipment and by the end of the project students created 27 short films on a range of different topics. ‘Olhar plea lente' demonstrates that the school is an important meeting place between young people and film. By providing the necessary guidance and resources to create opportunities for practical filmmaking, the school is a catalyst for personal and collective student growth, fostering skills and knowledge that positions students as better informed, integrated and active citizens….it is important to motivate young people to be interested in cinema, to discover what it is, what it means to make films and what we can think, feel, express and live through them.’ - Alves and Pereira ​ Key points to explore ​ The article provides a clear overview of a filmmaking project from start to finish, providing a useful model for teachers who would like to make films with their students. At the same time the authors do not shy away from describing the challenges involved and provide several key tips for readers to keep in mind. ​ The authors describe: ​ The unique benefits of schools as spaces for young people to encounter film and how ‘filmmaking and film literacy foster students’ motivation, engagement and productivity in terms of their relationship with their school and wider sociocultural environment.’ (pp.2-4) A clear timeline which can be used when planning your own filmmaking project. The article takes readers through the 16 weeks of the filmmaking course, and at points acts almost as a project diary, describing the weekly tasks and outcomes (pp.8-21) An emphasis on the importance of preparation, and also of valuing the filmmaking process as a learning experience just as much as the final result (p.7) Reflections on how the project could have been improved, particularly in terms of managing staff and students’ expectations, overall time management, and the challenges of working with less motivated students (pp.22-25) ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Ideas for the classroom ​ You don't need expensive cameras to make films with your students - they can be made simply on school iPads or smartphones! For a great guide to filmmaking with iPads, check out the free resource provided by Into Film: https://www.intofilm.org/resources/1146 ​ Further resources and opportunities ​ Four of the 26 films have been uploaded to the Portuguese film education platform Primeiro Plano, and can be accessed through the following link: https://primeiroplano.ciac.pt/projeto/olhar-pela-lente/ . The short film Hidden Realities is embedded at the bottom of the page. For teachers based in Scotland who are keen to develop their filmmaking skills, a number of local community film organisations provide filmmaking workshops and courses. Try Screen Education Edinburgh: https://www.screen-ed.org / GMAC Film (Glasgow) https://www.gmacfilm.com / or SHMU - Station House Media Unit (Aberdeen) http://www.shmu.org.uk/ Have you made a film with your class? Consider submitting it to the Scottish Youth Film Festival http://syff.scot/ or FANS Youth Film Festival https://filmaccess.scot/festival/ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Listen to Pedro Alves and Ana Sofia Pereira discuss the challenges and opportunities of their high-school filmmaking project with Flip Kulakiewicz, Administrator at the Film Education Journal.

  • Resource: Teaching Film in Scotland | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources Resource: Teaching Film in Scotland Resource: The BFI and London Film School Resource: Animation and Education Resource: Cinema en Curs Resource: Donnelly, See You Tomorrow Resource: Mirjana Borčić discussing film Resource: Alves, 16-week film course Resource: Felipe Correa Documentary Resource: Michael Daly Resource: Jamie - UC Resource: Vega - Community Cinema Search Results Exploring pathways of film education throughout students’ experiences of Scottish secondary school Learn how to use Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone in the classroom (Copyright Warner Brothers) Exploring pathways of film education throughout students’ experiences of Scottish secondary school ​ Kerry Abercrombie is a teacher of Media and English at Larbert High School in Falkirk, Scotland. The school offers a unique specialist pathway called School of Media, where young people are able to engage with film education throughout their entire experience of high school. ​ Kerry's article, accompanied by a range of images which showcase students’ work, describes how the School of Media successfully incorporates film education as part of Scotland’s national ‘Curriculum for Excellence’. It follows a chronological perspective, detailing specific aspects of School of Media’s approach within each of the six years of secondary school, and emphasising the importance of teacher-led approaches to film education within the classroom. ​ ‘Film is a subject that requires specialist knowledge, and there is sometimes a danger that film education in school settings is driven by enthusiasm rather than expertise. School of Media has been allowed to thrive due to a serendipitous collection of appropriately qualified specialists gathered in the same place, sharing common enthusiasms and a common purpose.’ - Kerry Abercrombie Download the full article for free from the Film Education Journal Key points to explore Kerry's article provides a detailed account of how film education is successfully being used in a secondary school setting to develop students’ literacy, critical analysis and creative skills as they progress through school. The article provides: An overview of Larbert High School, the creation of its School of Media, and its place in the Curriculum for Excellence (pp. 87-90) Detailed examples of the film-related tasks that students are set throughout the first and second year of School of Media, introducing them to concepts of critical theory and genre theory, and incorporating creative tasks relating to production design, mis-en-scene and practical filmmaking (pp. 90-96) Examples of films used as part of lessons including Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and Bohemian Rhapsody (pp. 90 and p.96) An overview of how film education is delivered to upper secondary students, within the constraints of a less flexible and exam-focussed period of school. Despite this, students are able to become involved in a range of filmmaking assignments (pp.97-103) and wider achievement opportunities (pp.103-104). Watch Kerry host a discussion with English and Media colleagues about how they delivered film education during the Covid-19 pandemic Ideas for the classroom: Kerry Abercrombie is a passionate advocate for film education and the important role it can play in students’ learning. Kerry is also an Into Film Scotland ambassador, and regularly draws upon their resources to use in the classroom - https://www.intofilm.org

  • Resource: Vega - Community Cinema | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources Resource: Teaching Film in Scotland Resource: The BFI and London Film School Resource: Animation and Education Resource: Cinema en Curs Resource: Donnelly, See You Tomorrow Resource: Mirjana Borčić discussing film Resource: Alves, 16-week film course Resource: Felipe Correa Documentary Resource: Michael Daly Resource: Jamie - UC Resource: Vega - Community Cinema Search Results Taking Wonders to the Margins: delivering community cinema workshops within marginalised communities in Chile Young filmmakers dressed as the Lumiere Brothers welcome the audience to a screening of their film Taking wonders to the margins (Maravillas al Margen ) ​ Alicia Vega is a Chilean film scholar, educator and outreach worker. In 1985 she initiated a series of cinema workshops within highly disadvantaged communities across Chile, which sought to provide younger children with early, formative understandings of cinema. Over the next 30 years Alicia and her team of instructors delivered hundreds of workshops across the country. Illustrated with photos, examples of the children's work, and testimonials from participants, her article is a rich and intimate account of how film can be used within community learning and outreach programmes. “The main achievements of the workshops certainly include that children experienced an increase in their self-esteem, developed their creativity and learned some fundamental values, such as working in a team. But our main objective, which was fundamental to us, was that the children had a good time.” - Alicia Vega Download the full article for free from the Film Education Journal Key points to explore Vega’s workshops consisted of weekly sessions where children watched films and then undertook various arts and crafts activities which were designed to break down the mechanics of filmmaking for them. This later developed into practical filmmaking sessions where they wrote, acted and filmed their own short films. ​ Vega introduces readers to the workshop methodology, particularly its focus on the history of early cinema and screen pioneers such as the Lumiere Brothers and Charlie Chaplin. Other topics covered in the article include: A detailed description of the arts and crafts activities which were designed to explore the history and mechanics of creating moving images, including the recreation of nineteenth century optical illusion toys such as zoetropes, the ‘magic roll’ and kinetoscopes (pp. 196-197) Vega's pedagogical approach - her belief of treating everyone equally, allowing the children a large amount of autonomy, and her solution to behavioral issues (pp.201-205) A discussion of the funding difficulties the workshops faced, including a frank overview of the economic hardships experienced by the local communities (pp. 205-215) A description of the films that were shown to workshop participants and their reactions to them (pp.216-221) Ideas for the classroom: Creating thaumatropes is a simple yet effective way of introducing learners to the concept of 'the moving image’ in its most basic form. The Norris Museum provides free downloadable resources and video instructions of how to create your own thaumatropes and kaleidoscopes:

  • Backup - Granton | Filmeducationjournal

    Home Teachers Resources Resource: Teaching Film in Scotland Resource: The BFI and London Film School Resource: Animation and Education Resource: Cinema en Curs Resource: Donnelly, See You Tomorrow Resource: Mirjana Borčić discussing film Resource: Alves, 16-week film course Resource: Felipe Correa Documentary Resource: Michael Daly Resource: Jamie - UC Resource: Vega - Community Cinema Search Results Filmmaking about social issues with primary school children in Scotland ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Aoife Donnelly and Avril Whelan (teachers, Granton Primary School) and Jamie Chambers (ECA, Film Education Journal) discussing how they used film in the classroom. See You Tomorrow: A case study of the Understanding Cinema project at Granton Primary School in Edinburgh ​ [LINK TO ARTICLE] ​ This article describes a filmmaking project which took place at an after-school film club at Granton Primary School in Edinburgh from 2016 to 2017. It is written by the teachers and filmmaker who were involved in the project and is a great first-hand account of the benefits and challenges to consider when creating films in a primary classroom context. There are a range of tips and ideas for you to take away and use back in the classroom with your pupils. The final film created by the pupils can be viewed online for free at the link below and provides a template which pupils can use when creating their own. The film could also be a starting point for conversations with your class around the challenging topic of bullying and racism within school life, discussing the difficult issues faced by the character and how they are resolved. “Seeing what seemed to me a bunch of sporadic, random clips all fit together as a film with a hugely powerful message was very moving. Furthermore, the kids who wrote, directed, acted and filmed each and every scene (lots of times!) were speechless watching their hard work back. Seeing it all put together and to see their project turned into a film was something they were very proud of. I remember them saying ‘that’s so good, I can’t believe we made that’” - Aoife Donnelly, Class Teacher (p.74) ​ Key points to explore : The article discusses a range of themes - below are a summary of certain points which you can read about in more detail, with page references so you can find them easily: • Setting up a filmmaking project: tips for preparing pupils; taking photographs as a way of expressing emotion visually and learning how to frame shots; how pupils learn to reflect upon and evaluate their work (pp.66-67) • The project’s direct links to the Curriculum for Excellence and how filmmaking can develop pupils’ skills in a range of key learning areas as well as their emotional literacy and personal development (p.67, 70) • How filmmaking is beneficial in developing pupils’ teamworking abilities and communication skills, particularly for students who struggle with traditional literacy and numeracy (p. 67, pp.69-70) • Challenges that teachers and pupils might face (p.67, 69, 72) ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Ideas for the classroom : Watch See You Tomorrow at the link above. ​ 1. Discuss the following questions with your class: ​ • What is the message of the film? • When making a film, what do you think are the biggest challenges for the filmmakers? • If you had the chance to make this film, what would you do differently? 2. Now rewatch the first minute of the film. Ask your students the following questions: • How many shots are there in the first 60 seconds? Get pupils to clap every time there is a cut. • Discuss the following questions with your pupils. How many shot types can they identify (close-up, medium shot, long shot etc)? Why do the filmmakers use these certain shots? What do they tell us about the characters? Further resources : ​ On practical filmmaking : film education charity Into Film has a free (registration required) step-by-step filmmaking guide, designed for primary schools, which will take you through all the stages of filmmaking: https://www.intofilm.org/resources/23 Films which tackle the theme of bullying: Into Film has a detail list of resources and film guides for both primary and secondary pupils https://www.intofilm.org/theme/33 Watch See You Tomorrow, the film discussed in the article above. Watch Aoife Donnelly and Avril Whelan (teachers, Granton Primary School) and Jamie Chambers (ECA, Film Education Journal) discussing how they used film in the classroom both for See You Tomorrow and beyond, with contributions from some of the children who participated in the process.

bottom of page